the dan milner photography blog: tales of an adventuring photo chimp

October 5, 2013

Story behind – The Bikemag Afghanistan cover shot

Filed under: bike, photography — Tags: , , , , , — danmilner @ 2:05 pm

Matt Hunter, Afghanistan

If you haven’t caught it yet, the Nov issue of Bike is out now, with the full 16 page Afghanistan story and cover shot. Here’s the backstory behind my image that graces the cover.

Nov

14 hours is a long time to cover a mere 150Km, especially in an old Toyota Hiace with 4 bald tyres. But that’s what it took to travel the last day along a rough Afghan road to our ride starting point, Sarhad. And that came after 3 other days on the road. So you can imagine how good it felt to finally be out on the bikes. A lot of people think that as a photographer you’ll come back from expeditions with hundreds of cover-possibilites, after all the opportunities must arise each and every half hour. But the truth is that on trips like this, with distances to cover, rivers to ford, passes to climb each day, making the call on whether to stop and set up a shot is a gamble. It interrupts the flow, and sucks up time. Stop every time a possible shot comes up, and you don’t make it to camp and end up sleeping with the goats on a remote hillside with no supper (but at least you have a sheep to keep you warm). With absolutely no idea what scenery or what kind of trail or action potential you’re going to happen on later in the trip, you start out eyeing every corner, every backdrop, every rock as a possible shot. But inevitably, you have to (begrudgingly) pass some by.

So it’s kind of funny that the shot that is gracing Bikemag’s cover this month was the first action shot of our whole 3 week, 12 day ride trip to Afghanistan. Riding out of Sarhad village (down on the valley floor in the background) we climbed 600m/2000ft straight up to this first pass, wheezing in the thin air, and knowing this was just a taste of what lay ahead. And in this one scene, with its braided river and snowy peaks, its dusty trail and steep rocky pass, summed up the landscape we were to live in for 12 days. And not an AK47 to be seen.

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September 28, 2013

Story Behind -Afghanistan #2

Filed under: bike, photography — Tags: , , , , , — danmilner @ 8:52 am

No.2 Hey, Nobody said it would be easy.

Image

Matt Hunter starts the long walk into the unknown. Again. Nikon D600, Zeiss 18/3.5

Yaks are the ultimate 4×4 in a place like Afghanistan. They go through anything. Unfortunately we had horses and donkeys instead to carry our expedition camping gear for our 12 day haul. And after 3 days of alternating blizzards and sunny spells, they just couldn’t make it over second 16,000 ft pass we climbed on day 6, the snow was too deep. Our choice was either to try to swap our horses for yaks and re-attempt the pass next day, or go the long way round, a 30 mile down valley and up the next route that was too exposed and technical for horses. At least that’s what we’d been told by the local Afghan horsemen not wishing to lose their earnings to yak-herders, as the reason why we attempted the pass.

Beaten back by deep snow, we took the alternative route, one that proved just as hard as the 16,000ft pass we’d retreated from the day before. A morning of flowing, fun riding ended at this deep canyon, and along with it any resemblance of ridable trail. Steep, loose and bottoming out in a raging snow-melt  river we had no option but to descend into the abyss, wade the river and shoulder our bikes, again. It took us another 7 hours of soaking wet, freezing cold bike pushing through more blizzards to reach our final destination that day, a camp spot at 14,000 ft perched beneath a mighty glacier. Arriving a mere half hour before nightfall, no-one had the energy left to appreciate our surroundings, but we’d found a way round. And still had the horses in tow. Afghans are a resourceful people.

August 22, 2013

The Story Behind- Afghanistan #1

A photo is worth a thousand words. Apparently. But sometimes there’s more behind an image than can be seen. An image conveys its own story, conjures up a feeling, stirs an emotion. But what of the story behind shooting it?  Over the next couple of months I’ll endeavour to bring you a few of the images that are currently showcased on bikemag.com from the recent Afghanistan mountain bike trip I shot in June with Anthill films and pro rider Matt Hunter. It’ll tied you over until the print stories come out in the mags through October and November.

No. 1: Nearly missing dinner.

Milner_Afgn013_0979

The story: Half way through our 12 day loop and we still hadn’t a clue what to expect. It’s hard to know how much energy and time to exert shooting when you have no idea what’s coming up later, what scenes will offer themselves up, or how far it is still to go before catching up with our horsemen and overnight gear. An  early start and a long day in the saddle didn’t stop us working a dusty ridge top until the sun was low, giving us the golden hour of perfect light to shoot. After all, the Kyrgyz herders’ yurt village was in view, or almost, just over the ridge, down towards the river. We shot, and shot, and shot more, Hunter doing his thing and delivering  A-roll material without fail.

And then we began the descent and realised we hadn’t a clue where we were heading. In the distance was not one, but several different plumes of fire smoke, each representing a different Kyrgyz yurt settlement. Our Afghan support and our gear could have been at any. We had no idea and darkness was 20 minutes away, and with it freezing temperatures.  I rode off towards the river valley, towards one smoke plume, the others veered left towards another distant settlement, each of us scouring the landscape for any evidence of our support team. And that’s when this pic happened., Matt and Brice silhouetted against the glow of the mountains we’d just descended. Chance favours a prepared mind. All I had to do was work out if stopping for the shot would mean getting left behind, to bivi out the night alone clad only in my riding gear. I took the risk. Nikon D600. 40-200 f4.

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