the dan milner photography blog: tales of an adventuring photo chimp

November 11, 2014

Alive and kicking – my new website is up

Filed under: bike, life, outdoors, photography, snow — Tags: , — danmilner @ 8:34 am

It was meant to be down for 2 weeks. Three months late my new website is finally up, using a completely new format, look and a fresh set of images. A lot of them.

A thousand of a second to shoot, three months to get up online.

A thousand of a second to shoot, three months to get up online.

What was meant to be a simple task  -dropping in a decent set of images into a photoshelter template and putting danmilner.com back online- turned out to be quite a lot longer process than I’d anticipated. When I start digging, I seem to have, err… quite a lot of photos that would look great full screen bleed on the smart new site, and narrowing my selection down to a manageable, less bewildering but representative edit was more than could be done in my tea-break. Throw in a few select ‘special projects’ galleries, add a sprinkle of more recent commercial work and still keep time aside to actually go out and shoot, and.. well you get the idea.

And then there are the captions. Every single image has a caption of some sort – from simple athlete and/or location details to a little background story to the pic. I guess I need to get quicker at typing.

Whatever, it’s up and live and kicking. All you have to do is make a cup of tea, grab a biscuit (hell, make it a packet) and sit back and enjoy it.

www.danmilner.com

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April 6, 2014

Putting the “Rad” back into … err, daily life.

Filed under: photography, snow — Tags: , , , , , — danmilner @ 11:04 am

Yep, I know you’ve been waiting for this to happen. I’ve teamed up with the good people at Radshot.com to offer you the chance to easily keep your snow-obsessed habits topped up with a daily does of rad-ness, by way of incredibly beautiful snowboard photography that we photographers work ruddy hard and take enormous selfless risks to shoot.

I’ve rummaged in my somewhat bulging drawers  -swollen to bursting point with well-over 15 years of snowboard imagery shot in places such as Greenland, Alaska, Russia and Pakistan and capturing the snowy antics of riders like Travis Rice and Jeremy Jones-  to hand Radshot.com a big wad of my belters to offer as a daily FREE photo of the day. Just head over to their site and subscribe to get your daily photo fix, or do that social media thing (whatever that is) to connect with them @RadShotPics.

My images will start gracing their site at random intervals from today. And when you’re done gawping too long and realise that you have forgotten your loved one’s birthday/Xmas/anniversary you can order a photo or canvas print of any of the images you see, easy, at the click of a button apparently, delivered direct to your door for a very, very reasonable price.

Oh and there are some other photographers on the site too. So be warned….

Rice wishes he'd taken his kayak instead of his splitboard. Going over the rapids, AK style.

T-Rice wishes he’d taken his kayak instead of his splitboard. Going over the rapids, AK style.

February 2, 2014

Think you know snow? Treading lightly on the Voelkl ski shoot.

Filed under: photography, snow — Tags: , , , , , — danmilner @ 4:16 pm
Working safe, mellow, north aspects is all about working the light. Freeride World Tour champ Nadine Wallner works some magic as the snow begins to heavy-up. Shots like this I use manual focus to give me more freedom of composition. Nikon D3s, 70-200/4, 1/1000, f11.

Working safe, mellow, north aspects is all about working the light. Freeride World Tour champ Nadine Wallner works some magic as the snow begins to heavy-up. For shots like this I use manual pre-focus to give me more freedom of composition. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4 @ 1/1000/f11.

Like kids and animals, I’d throw in snow as being one of the hardest things to work with (not that I’ve done an awful lot of work with kids or animals I add). This month saw our annual shoot for ski hardware-meisters Voelkl. With dates booked months in advance, and a whole team of 15 professional athletes descending on the location for a 4-day session, I’d be lying if I pretended that I don’t get anxious in the few days before the shoot. Snow is fickle. It comes, it goes, it crusts, it gets heavy.  But you have to work with what you’ve got, and make it work, and that’s the difference between being a pro photographer and a lucky enthusiast. Your images are the single end result of a lot of planning and the handing over of a significant shoot budget.  In 4 days, 4 photographers are to capture most of the companies vast image needs for both the ISPO product launch and the rest of the year’s marketing blurb. And its with this knowledge that you step out, camera in hand.

And that’s where the snow bit comes in.

Aspirational is only half the story on commercial shoots. Marketing people like to see what they are selling, and that's where Per Jonsson comes in. he's the kind of athlete you can trust to miss you when you get in close. Tracking fast approaching subjects is a great test for autofocus, and one of the only times I use it. Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @ 1/2500, f5.6.

‘Aspirational’ is only half the story on commercial shoots. After all marketing people like to see what they are selling, and that’s where Per Jonsson comes in. He’s the kind of pro athlete you can trust to miss you when you get in close. Tracking fast approaching subjects is a great test for autofocus and one of the only times I use it. Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @ 1/2500, f5.6.

Early snow in the Alps can make people complacent. Shouts of “its gonna be a huge winter” echo around the valleys. But in reality, the early snow and cold spell just left a dangerous hoar-frost layer and weak snowpack for any off-piste skiing. This is the kind of consideration that adds a certain pressure to real ski shoots -you know the kind of shoots that really capture the aspirational, the kind of stuff that’s put my name on the map for the last decade and a half.

And then it changed. Kind of.

Fresh snow before the shoot is always a relief. It puts pay to all that head scratching, wondering what the heck we’re going to shoot and where we’re going to do it. But it also buries that weak, avalanche-prone layer. So it’s within these criteria that we set out on the Voelkl shoot, keeping to safe areas and watching as the heat wave reduced most south facing slopes to heavy, lifeless mush. Pro ski photography is all about reading signs. It’s about reading warning signs in the weather, it’s about seeing which way the wind has blown, which way the light is angled, about reading signs in your athletes faces and body language that say “Well Dan, I’ve kind of had enough hiking today.”

Pro ski photography is about knowing snow.

Last run of the day and the camera's still out. Occasionally we take a free run, but when the terrain looks liek this and the light is reflected off the biggest peak in Europe, you've just got to keep shjooting. Nadine Wallner heading home. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4 @ 1/1000, f 7.1

Last run of the day and the camera’s still out. Occasionally we might grab a no photos, free run, but when the terrain looks like this and the dying light is reflected off the biggest peak in Europe, you’ve just got to keep shooting. Nadine Wallner heading home. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4 @ 1/1000, f 7.1

December 18, 2013

Landing the Patagonia Winter covershot – by staying on the ground

Filed under: photography, snow — Tags: , , , , , , — danmilner @ 10:19 am

Just got this in my inbox. And I’m well chuffed. It’s admirable outdoor brand Patagonia’s new 2014 winter catalogue -just out- with my shot adorning its cover.

Forrest Shearer, splitboarding the Dolomites. Nikon D3s, Nikkor 70-200 f4.

Forrest Shearer, splitboarding the Dolomites. Nikon D3s, Nikkor 70-200 f4.

My near two-decades of shooting snowboarding has seen its twists and turns. I’ve shot in some of the world’s wildest places, flown in helicopters and ski-planes, dug snowmobiles out of trouble, dodged polar bears and camped through some less-than hospitable temperatures. I’ve shot for dozens of different brands and had the fortune to shoot with some of the world’s most legendary riders, from Craig Kelly to Travis Rice and more.

But seeing this image work for Patagonia is a highlight, and here’s why: It could be Patagonia’s more environmentally conscious approach fits better with my own lifestyle. It could be that Forrest is a very, very nice bloke to share time with in the backcountry and a talented rider to boot. It could be that having shunned helicopter trips for the last few years after questioning their role in our climate-challenged snow sports, this backcountry session, like so many in the last few years, was all about splitboarding. Or it could be that this images gets printed on over a million catalogues and everyone says “wow, that is a dope shot!” and I get more beers bought for me in the pub. The jury’s out.

Thanks Patagonia. Thanks Forrest.

January 15, 2013

Getting Vocal with Voelkl -a picture is worth a thousand words….

If this is a taste of the year ahead, I’ll be needing more memory cards. A 4-day shoot for Voelkl skis kicked off my 2013, in conditions that were about as perfect as we were going to get in the Alps. Quite a contrast from last years avalanche dodging and jib-tastic escapade. I was given the services of international backcountry freestylers Dylan Hood and Dash Longe from the USA and Flo Wieser (austria) and PA Chedal (France) to try to nail all the images needed by Voelkl to launch a brand new flagship backcountry ski at next month’s ISPO trade fair. Hmm, not that there was any pressure or anything.

The nerdy bit: It also gave me the chance to try out my new Nikon 70-200 f4G lens.. the new lighter (850g), but one stop slower counterpart to the usual 70-200 f2.8 I lug about. And when I say “lug” I mean. Lug. The f2.8 is a back-straining 1500g. Add that to a D3s body (1240g), a 24-70 f2.8 (900g), a 14-24 f2.8 (970g), a 50 f1.4 (290g) and a few accessories, and you have some heft. I’ve been waiting for Nikon to emerge with the f4 since I first heard rumours of its development a year ago. It was one of the lenses in Canon’s amoury that I missed when I switched to Nikon from Canon 2 years ago, especially when hiking the backcountry. (I’ll be seeing how the D600 and 16-35 f4, 70-200 f4 combo goes down when Jeremy Jones/TGR start calling for the next expedition..).

So here’s a peek at what pleased Voelkl….

This spot rarely fails to deliver... nor does Flo's 720. Backlighting is my way, and while the new 70-200 f4 is sharp and no doubt autofocuses without hesitation, I actually manually focussed on the take off to allow a more relaxed composition.

This spot rarely fails to deliver… nor does Flo’s 720. Backlighting is my way, and while the new 70-200 f4 is sharp and no doubt autofocuses without hesitation, I actually manually focussed on the take off to allow a more relaxed composition. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4, 1/1600, f.7.1.

I thik this was the 10th shot I have taken with the new 70-200 f4. yeah I'm happy. Dylan Hood sends a rooster tail that you normally see in snowboarding. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4. 1/100, f/8.

I think this was the 10th shot I have taken with the new 70-200 f4. Happy? Yeah I’m happy! Dylan Hood sends a ski rooster tail that you normally see in snowboarding. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4. 1/1000, f/8.

 

Seeing the skis can be a problem when shooting marketing shots in powder. Unless you have Dylan along for the ride. The base shot. Nikon D3s, 14-24 f2.8. 1/1250, f6.3.

Seeing the skis can be a problem when shooting marketing shots in powder. Unless you have Dylan along for the ride. The base shot. Nikon D3s, 14-24 f2.8. 1/1250, f6.3.

 

The evolution of skiing. Flo lays out a surf turn and gets barrelled. This was the last shot of the day, last shot of the shoot. I didnt know quite where he was going to lay out this turn on the bank, so kept the composition loose, the depth of field reasonable at f7.1, and tracked him in, adjusting my composition as he began the turn. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4,@ 1/2000, f7.1, ISO 200.

The evolution of skiing. Flo lays out a surf turn and gets barrelled. This was the last shot of the day, last shot of the shoot. I didnt know quite where he was going to lay out this turn on the bank, so kept the composition loose, the depth of field reasonable at f7.1, and tracked him in, adjusting my composition as he began the turn. Nikon D3s, 70-200 f4,@ 1/2000, f7.1, ISO 200.

All work and no play make Dan a dull(er) boy. Not strictly part of the shoot, but a "free run" down the Rectaline couloir on day 4 allowed the skiers to get the new skis dialled, and me to try the new Nikon D600 body. You know "free runs" are going to be a little different whren the guide (stian) says  " take it easy at the pinch, its not a place to fall" and " and at the bottom of the coulir there is a 1m ice shelf to drop off so don't go charging through..". Nikon D600, 14-24 f2.8 @1/1000, f5.6. ISO 100.

All work and no play make Dan a dull(er) boy. Not strictly part of the shoot, but a “free run” down the Rectaline couloir on day 4 allowed the skiers to get the new skis dialled, and me to try my new Nikon D600 body. You know “free runs” are going to be a little “different” when the guide (Stian Hagen) says “..take it easy at the pinch, its not a place to fall… oh, and at the bottom of the couloir there is a 1m ice shelf to drop off so don’t go charging through..”. Nikon D600, 14-24 f2.8 @1/1000, f5.6. ISO 100.

December 31, 2012

A lot of legwork: 2012 in pictures

Another 12 months. Another set of blinding adventure shoots, my busiest year yet.  One that included camping through -20C temps and shooting for a handful of new clients and one that squeezed in 100 days on the bike. Here’s a look at 2012 through my lens…

January kicked off with the Volkl ski shoot while most were still heavy headed from new Year revelries. Heavy storms meant most of the Chamonix valley was closed due to avalanche dangers and we had to get creative for the shots.

Nikon D3S, 70-200 2.8 @ 1/250, f5.6. 2x speedlites

Nikon D3S, 24-70 2.8 @ 1/250, f5.6. 2x speedlites & Pocketwizards TT5.

I  had this statue jib (above) in mind for 3 years, waiting for conditions to shoot it. I finally managed to get the shot I had envisaged for so long.

Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8 @1/1000, f7.1

Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8 @1/1000, f7.1

Meanwhile on the mountain, amazing low January light (above) delivered side-lighting that helps render any scene a beautiful aspirational image, while shooting from an elevated vantage point means you get to see the ski graphics. That always keeps a ski client happy. I start shooting for Volkl again next week.

February saw the coldest weather hit Europe for 50 years. It was the month I teamed up with Jeremy Jones and TGR for the Further project, meaning camping for a week through -20C temperatures in Austria, followed by a week in a remote refuge. Both backcountry forays involved 5 hour access approaches, dragging all our gear needed for surviving and filming/shooting, forcing decisions on what kit (which cameras? lenses?) was really essential. It was one of the harshest winter sessions I, or any of the TGR film team, have endured during the 4 years of filming Deeper and Further. The Further movie came out in the autumn. It’s a banger.

Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8 @ 1/1000, f8.

Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8 @ 1/1000, f8. This image has become O’Neill’s prime advert image for 2012/13 season.

Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @ 1/250, f6.3. Our camp in the cold Karwendel range.

Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @ 1/250, f6.3.  Our camp in the cold Karwendel range. The sun never reached camp and 2 of our athletes never changed out of the same set of their outerwear even in their sleeping bags.

Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @1/200, f4.  Shooting with Jones always means early starts. No time to warm boots; just get on with it.

Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @1/200, f4.  Time: 6.30am. Shooting with Jones always means early starts. No time to warm boots; just get on with it.

The cold continued during a shoot for Mens Fitness magazine on Biathlon (below). Shooting in -17C meant trying not to touch any of the bare metal of camera or lens while trying to dodge frostbite.

Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8 @1/1000, f4.5.

Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8 @1/1000, f4.5. Our MF journo chases his instructor into the icy wastelands of a very cold winter.

March delivered a return to winter tent life via a trip to Kyrgyzstan (below). If truth be told I didn’t want to go to Kyrgyzstan, having been misled by 3 previous trips to Russia as to how testing such trips to ex-Soviet countries can be. Sometimes even the ‘dream job’ can seem a nightmare. Camping in a traditional yurt at 2600m for a week and splitboarding the mountains around it had its scary moments but the whole trip proved to be enormously rewarding. A great country. Very friendly people. I am planning to go back, with the bike.

Nikon D3s, 14-24 2.8 @1/1000 f8. Stentiford lays out before a stunning Kyrgyz backdrop, only a few miles from the China border.

Nikon D3s, 14-24 2.8 @1/1000 f8. Stentiford lays out before a stunning Kyrgyz backdrop, only a few miles from the China border. Snow instabilities meant a lot of the steeper lines stayed out of reach.

Leica M8, Voigtlander 40 1.4 @ 1/20, f2. The Leica always seems less intrusive when it comes to capturing local colour. We stayed with a Kyrgyz family for a night, and kept their little girls entertained with our western habits.

Leica M8, Voigtlander 40 1.4 @ 1/20, f2. The Leica always seems less intrusive when it comes to capturing local colour. We stayed with a Kyrgyz family for a night, and kept their little girls entertained with our western habits.

Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @1/30, f10, tripod. Our home for a week. No TV, no cellphone. Perfect.

Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8 @1/30, f10, tripod. Our yurt home for a week. No TV, no cellphone. Perfect. People seem less willing to disconnect from the obtrusive technology  that seems to dominate our lives now. If they did they might appreciate being alive.

Hit the more button below for the rest of the gallery….

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September 8, 2012

Further.. Nearer.. Now: Behind the scenes of Further.

Filed under: snow — Tags: , , , , — danmilner @ 12:15 pm

‘F*ck this!’  became my second frequent phrase (after, ‘..it’s tea-time, right?’) during the 3-week Austria filming session for Jeremy Jones/TGR’s new film , Further back in February this year. Camping through constant -20C temperatures for a week was one of the toughest things I’ve ever done: tougher than last year’s Arctic nonsense, tougher than our Deeper AK expedition that primed this whole ballgame. It made me swear. A lot.

And now after two flippin’ years in the making, it’s with us. Further premiered yesterday in Tahoe. In 60-minutes, TGR have condensed two years of cold camping trips in places where sometimes you’d rather not be.  2 years of feeling remote, of hiking lines and getting shut down by the weather. 2 years of patience, frustration, debates, angst and laughter. 2 years of listening to American accents. 2 years of eating freeze dried meals and sh*tting in the snow. And 2 years of unique life experiences.

And to celebrate the culmination of two years of a lot of people’s efforts, I thought it would be nice’ to throw together a few images that capture some of what I shared with the project during the 8 cold weeks I spent with the film crew and athletes in Arctic Svalbard and Austria during the making of this film. A behind the scenes peek at Further through 18 photography insights.. below:

Sub zero temperatures mess with the cheese. After only a couple of days and nights the only way of even getting near to cutting this block of cheese was to use a snow-saw. Our first week out in Austria this year was accompanied by the coldest persistent temperatures on record for over 50 years.

Camp cold. This was as close as the sun got to hitting camp, meaning a 2-3 hour hike up to reach its warming rays and escape the real cold of the valley floor. It took us 5 hours to skin in and haul our gear to this camp zone. Nick the film tech guy hardly ever got to leave camp. I think his fingers are still there.

Mitch digs the window. By contrast our second session in Austria used an unstaffed refuge. It was cosy once we were inside. All we had to do was find it in the dark at 8pm amidst swirling snow remnants of a three day storm and dig it out. Here Klaus and Mitch excavate the window. This was our home for 4 days. Unlike the -20C camp session a week before, I would have been happy to stay here a lot longer.

The Hut. The hut’s location sat it right between some big lines and some small mini-golf warm up runs. I wish we’d known about these gaping cliffs when we were probing about in the dark trying to find the hut, or maybe not.

Topo map of fun. Klaus our guide studies a topo map of the area around the hut. Red colour indicates slope angle above 40 degrees if I remember rightly. Not a lot of room for error here. It is terrain that pushed our limits once the temps started warming up.

Waiting, drying. Being stormed out of the coldest valley in Europe meant having a hotel room for a couple of days to sit out the worst of the storm. It meant drying out tents and kit in any way we could.

Red dawn. Projects with Jones always mean early starts: we’ve done it in AK, in Canada and in the Arctic, but it never gets easier. Clawing your way from a sleeping bag in a hut in the dark is no real hardship, but doing the same from a tent in -20C weather means digging deep inside. Every move as you struggle free releases a shower of frost from the tent fabric. Once you’re out and the sun is rising though, you know why you’re there.

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July 2, 2012

Kill Your Television. Milner lands EpicTV job and it’s not as tea-boy.

Filed under: bike, photography, snow — Tags: — danmilner @ 4:16 pm

I’ve got to apologise for the absence of posts of late. It’s been a busy time. Following up 3 weeks spent getting my ass thrashed around the trails of California and Colorado by the likes of Yeti, WTB, Easton and Rockshox employees (more about those sordid episodes later), I’ve also taken on the role as epicTV.com’s new MTB editor.

Milner and Cook. Comedy hour at its finest.

This latest commitment is less me sucking up to my megalomanic, egocentric tendencies and more a chance to apply my 25-plus years of MTB knowledge and involvement in a new adventure-film-on-demand online portal. This way, with 2 blogs to keep updated,  I get to spend more of my time in front of computers and even less time riding than before. Hmm. Guess I should have thought about that first. But fear not. Think of it as you getting two for the price of one, of gaining a daughter rather than losing a son.

So pop over to epicTV’s blog and catch my ramblings and our latest podcast in which we interview the guy behind the Line of Sight bike-messenger racing movie or subscribe online to epicTV’s ever expanding library of HD adventure movies, where bike, snow and depths dangerously adventuresome depths are waiting to be plummed from the safety and comfort of your own sofa. (I promise there are none of my inexcusably amateur offerings in their library). Or just go out and ride your bike/snowboard/kayak instead.

April 7, 2012

The Svalbard Chronicles Episode 4: Patience

The most useful attribute that 15 years of shooting snowboarding professionally has drummed into me is that of patience. Being patient with your riders and respecting the enormous effort they are putting in and the risks they are taking to get a picture forms the basis of a solid, healthy working relationship. Of course, if you’re out on an ice-field somewhere up near the North pole dealing with 24 hours of daylight and the eternal threat of polar bears, this kind of notion can slip from your everyday working practice.

Here is episode 4 of my random set of behind-the-scenes look at our TGR Further Svalbard trip with Jeremy Jones and Terje Haakenson.

March 16, 2012

Kyrgyzstan: The yurt locker.

Filed under: snow — Tags: , , — danmilner @ 8:49 am

I have got to admit, until a month ago I wouldn’t have been able to place Kyrgyzstan on a map. It’s a different story now. Now I know where it is. I know what the people look like. I know how cold it gets there. I know what they speak there. I know what they eat (it’s not a very vegetarian-friendly place I can tell you). I know how bumpy their roads are.

I just spent the last 10 days in this ex-USSR central Asian country shooting a story on staying in a traditional yurt at 2650m and splitboarding the adjacent rugged mountains. Let’s face it, a comfy yurt with its wood stove to dry kit, is a way friendlier place to sit about in post-shred than the usual sub-zero tents that seem to have become my home-from-home on the TGR Deeper/Further trips of late, and with local villagers’ horses on hand to porter our kit up the initial 800m climb to our base, things were looking easy from the off.

How naive. After seeing a stable snowpack for all of february, seasonal weather effects on a continental snowpack began a heavy avalanche cycle just before our arrival, meaning with our guide (40tribesbackcountry.com), we had to tread lightly in this uncompromising terrain. This isn’t the place to have things go wrong. And then there was getting up there. Everything we rode meant 1000m of climbing from the yurt each day, with the usual huffing and puffing that goes hand-in-hand with altitudes of 3500m/11,500 ft. And then there were the local taxis. Kyrgyzstan is the place where VW Passats go to die it seems.

But that’s what adventure is all about: new experiences and acquaintances, hardships, bumpy hours in the backs of decaying vehicles, and the absence of tofu burgers. I now feel a little better acquainted with Kyrgyzstan. Now where on the map is Ulaanbaatr…?

Camera-wise, I headed there armed with the Nikon D3s & Nikon 2.8 glass for the action stuff and my quintissential, less invasive Leica M8 for the travel shots. the story will grace a number of snow-related titles next winter.

James Stentiford rides 'eggs and bacon', a safe, if mellow line at last light before another night in the yurt locker. Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8.

Our Russian taxi driver is called 'Schumacher'. His taxi is a 1985 ex-soviet army bus. He starts the engine by touching 2 bare wires together. Nikon D3s, 50 1.4.

Italian Tania Detomas skins the slow grind up to a line way above the valley floor, long before she has had her morning cappuccino. Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8.

This was the scary scene that greeted us on the mountain: Leeward NE faces that were self releasing and cleaning out. Time to take it easy. For scale, this face is about 900m vertical. Nikon D3s, 24-70 2.8.

Horses are more important than cars for a lot of Kyrgyz people. At a sunday market, young Kyrgyz lads encourage their horses to barge each other in training for local 'no rules' polo, called Kok-Boru, that uses a headless sheep carcass as the 'ball'. Leica M8, Zeiss 28 2.8.

The Yurt locker. Home from home for 5 tired nights in a land inhabited by wolves and bears.The seeds of a vegetarian diet have now been sown here. Nikon D3s, 14-24 2.8.

Sheep and Ladas and mobile phones. Rural Kyrgyz gather from 3am at the Karakol livestock market to buy or sell sheep, bundling their live purchases into the boots of Ladas. Leica M8, Voigtlander 15 4.5.

It took 4 hours to skin to this face at 3500m, only to find the snowpack stability less than friendly and we were forced to retreat. The real art of mountain riding is knowing when to back away. Nikon D3s, 70-200 2.8.

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